Spanish Heritage

 

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From the age of twelve years old, F. Luis Mora traveled to Spain every few years. As an adult, Mora obtained permits to copy the Spanish masters in El Museo Nacional del Prado, and he also rented a studio to fulfill commissions.  Art dealers Alfred Stieglitz and William Macbeth were his primary patrons for Spanish paintings. Mora also had solo shows of his works from Spain at the Knoedler Gallery and Thompson Gallery in New York City. 

Luis Mora often studied and copied the works of the Spanish masters in the Prado. He was strongly influenced by Velazquez. and Mariano Fortuny I. His copy of a Velazquez masterpiece, young Prince Baltasar Carlos, hangs on the wall. This scene was painted in the artist's studio in Manhattan, reflecting Mora's international vision of himself.  In his self portrait, the artist is dressed as Velazquez.  He is surrounded by artifacts from various periods, a classical Roman sculpture, and an antique Japanese warrior. Silk Spanish shawls hang on racks. 

 

 

 

 

The Fortune Teller, 1905, oil on canvas, 60 x 48 inches. Signed, dated, and inscribed "Madrid."  Collection, Butler Museum of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.

The Fortune Teller won a gold medal at the Panama-Pacific Exhibition, held at The Palace of Fine Arts, San Francisco, 1915. 

It was published in Galleries of the Exhibition by Eugen Neuhaus, Paul Elder & Company, 1915.


 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Black Mantilla, oil on canvas, 22 x 18 inches, circa 1915, Private Collection.

 

Study for Fantasy of Goya, 1916, pastel on paper, 21 x 17 inches. Study for oil painting with the same name, 1909. (Whereabouts of the oil is unknown.) 

 

Click HERE to view further Spanish paintings.